Yom Kippur — The Holiest Day of the Year

Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for Jewish peoples. It is traditionally observed with intense fasting and prayer often spending most of the day in synagogue. This year Yom Kippur is observed from sundown on Tuesday, October 8 through sundown on Wednesday, October 9th.

According to Jewish tradition, God inscribes each person's fate for the coming year into The Book of Life, on Rosh Hashanah and waits until Yom Kippur to "seal" the verdict. During the Days of Awe, a Jew tries to amend their behavior and seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God and against other individuals. The evening and day of Yom Kippur are set aside for public and private petitions and confessions of guilt (Vidui). At the end of Yom Kippur, one hopes that they have been forgiven by God.

Yom Kippur - The Day of Atonement

Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, begins on October 8th at sundown. Watch now as Fellowship President Yael Eckstein explains the significance of this most holy day on the Jewish calendar and how it is observed in Israel and around the world.

What is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar, is the culmination of the High Holy Days that began ten days ago with Rosh Hashanah. It represents the final opportunity for teshuvah, repentance, and it is observed with prayers, fasting, and beseeching God for forgiveness.

Jonah: God's Reluctant Prophet

The book of Jonah is traditionally read during Yom Kippur services as it is the story of repentance, forgiveness, and second chances. Jonah's story reminds us that even when we stumble and sin, if we turn to God, He is quick to forgive and no one is beyond the reach of His compassion.

The Yom Kippur Goats

The Yom Kippur service today no longer includes many of the elements as prescribed in the Bible, including the two goats. Yet, the message inherent in this ritual still resonates for us today. Learn more with this devotional teaching.